Classroom Murals

Downloadable digital Murals with Lesson Plans

Why include Street MURAL Art and Graffiti Art in the Secondary and Elementary Art and Self Awareness Curriculum?

Because it is a “BIG IDEA” on a “BIG WALL” CONNECTING  OUR STUDENTS TO OUR HISTORY and CULTURES and themselves, THROUGH ART AND STORYTELLING

 Michelle Loughery  -Community Education “BIG IDEA” Programs are available with lesson plans, case studies, study guides and downloadable mural kits for teachers at the community level to use as education tools to inspire and encourage learning through community art in their classrooms.

Identifying social challenges in their communities, youth will develop community arts-based strategies for change, and encourage their peers to become involved in the implementation.

Community projects are available by request and will be overseen by a project artist, who will  working directly with youth, so that they can identify, plan and lead youth-driven projects that transform young lives and revitalize their communities. By taking an active role in implementing a community art project, young people build capacity and a sense of community engagement. In this, the program encourages pride in aboriginal heritage, youth civic engagement, capacity building, mentorship and leadership skills. Particular attention is placed on ensuring that selected projects:

Within secondary art education pedagogy, street and graffiti art can be included into the curriculum as a form of our daily visual culture and part of a visual language spoken by all. Street and graffiti art are occasionally avoided in the secondary curriculum, yet they have the power to foster new and different ways of learning for all students by encouraging students to explore notions of creative expression in community art in  public areas, including spaces not traditionally reserved for public art.

This type of critical thinking encourages students to question the definition of art, broadening their own personal definition of art and personal self awareness. For educators at the high school level, an art lesson on street and graffiti art can bridge the gap between daily visual culture and life, and the community the student lives in.